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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably a little late for this, as we're halfway thru winter already...my plan for winter maintenance has been to store the bike in the basement (probably no colder than 50s/60s all winter) and start it up once a month, put it in gear and let the tranny spin a bit, let it get to operating temp. Got the trickle charger on it (battery disconnected), and fuel stabilizer...will do the oil change at the start of riding season. Would there be anything bad with this plan? I always understood that machines are made to spin, and are better off in motion than sitting for long periods...
 

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I'd say you have a good plan there Kricket.

Just to be sure, the bike really does need to be at operating temperature for a while to burn off any condensation that may be in the oil pan, or elsewhere.

I presume that if you're going to let it run that long that you have a means of getting the fumes out of the house??

Lastly, the only other thing to be wary of is that some bikes will carbon up the spark plugs if idled repeatedly over winter like you describe.
If you can't take it out for a spin, it may help to increase the idle speed for a few minutes so that the plugs get nice and hot. ***You may need a fan on the engine during this! (I'm thinking of 3000rpm+)
 

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If you can't actually ride it anywhere, I'd just remove the battery from the bike and put it on a trickle charger and not bother with starting it up. As long as you ran it a bit to get the fuel stabilizer through the whole system, it'll be fine for 3-4 months.

When you do get back on it, you may notice a vibration that changes with road speed. That'll be the tires being a bit out of round from sitting for so long. It'll go away with a little time and heat. If that bugs you, put it up on stands for the duration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What condenses in the engine? I thought wintry air was dry...

I take it outside, put it on the rearstand, let it warm up, tugging the throttle every now and then :smirk:, drop it into first and let it spin with a few more revs, then shut 'er down, wheel it back inside, disconnect the battery, hook up the trickle charger, put it on the rearstand (don't have a front one), cock sock on the exhaust, cover over the bike, and it's naptime for another month.

I figure this is about the best I can do without going thru the hassle of getting at the cylinders to spray oil in and all. And wheeling it in and out of the basement should help prevent the front tire from getting a flat spot.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Kricket said:
What condenses in the engine? I thought wintry air was dry...

[/ QUOTE ]

Has nothing to do with the ambient air. Water is a byproduct of combustion. Water vapor is in the exhaust all the time. If you don't get the exhaust hot enough to evaporate it out, the pipes will rust from the inside out.

You may notice water dripping out of the tailpipe of cars that have just been started. That's where the water comes from, the exhaust gas itself.

Due to a condition that most all engines have called "blow-by" where a small amount of exhaust fumes make it past the piston rings into the crankcase. This water will condense inside the crankcase and cause things to rust. This is why you need to wait until the oil gets hot before shutting it off, so this water will boil off.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
ZOEY said:
[ QUOTE ]
start it up once a month

[/ QUOTE ]Don't do this!

CLICK HERE AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS :waytogo:

[/ QUOTE ]

The only issue I have with this routine is the use of WD40. It actually contains water so spraying it in the cylinders isn't a good idea unless you wait a few minutes for it to evaporate before you put the plugs back in.
 

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WD="water displacement". Water in WD40?????

From the WD-40 site:
(I was unable to find a listing of contents.)
[ QUOTE ]
Known as "the can with a thousand uses," WD-40 protects metal from rust and corrosion, penetrates stuck parts, displaces moisture, and lubricates just about anything. WD-40 is also great when it comes to cleaning grease, grime, and other marks from most surfaces.


CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape, stickers, and excess bonding material.
DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and hold firmly to all moving parts.
PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.

[/ QUOTE ]

Are you sure there is water in WD-40?

If you object, just squirt 10cc's or so of new motor oil into the cylinders and turn the engine over by hand. :waytogo:
 

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I'm about 90% sure there's a small amount of water in it. I could be wrong tho... /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Either way, I just use my handy can of 3-in-1 oil instead of WD40. Squirt a little in, turn it over a few times to spread it around, and done. That's just for my mower, as I ride year-round. :waytogo:
 

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[ QUOTE ]
1slowF3 said:
Due to a condition that most all engines have called "blow-by" where a small amount of exhaust fumes make it past the piston rings into the crankcase. This water will condense inside the crankcase and cause things to rust. This is why you need to wait until the oil gets hot before shutting it off, so this water will boil off.

[/ QUOTE ]


...also, as a side note, that blow-by has very acidic properties which are not good for the bearings at all.



Thanks 1SlowF3 for answering the condesation question.....
 

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[ QUOTE ]
BigAl_009R said:

...also, as a side note, that blow-by has very acidic properties which are not good for the bearings at all.

Thanks 1SlowF3 for answering the condesation question.....

[/ QUOTE ]

Welcome. :coolgleamA:
 
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