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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still new to street bikes so I'm still learning, bare with me please.

My rear tire is starting to look flat in the center. The front still looks new. My question is, how many miles under normal use will I get off tires? They where stock on the bike when I bought it ('05 ninja 500r) and are Perrialli(sp?) Basicly, when should I repleace my tires. So far I have 2k miles on my bike.

Also, what types of things will tires do as they wear? Other than slip smarty :tongue: I mean, will I "feel" any difference and can I stretch the use a bit?
 

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Tire wear will differ from one person to the next, from one bike to the next. For the 8K miles I can put on a set of Bridgestone BT012SS someone else might only squeeze out 1500 miles. :crazy: Inflation pressures will also play a role in this as underinflation will wear them out quicker.

The Pirelli Dragons I had fitted as OEM lasted (I think) about 12K miles before changing them out.

One wear issue you may encounter is cupping on the front tire. I've never seen a rear tire cupped before though but that doesn't mean it couldn't. A cupped front can behave a little odd at times like the front is wandering around.
 

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Pretty much what Duc said. As for how I determine, on mine since I commute with it and ride on the weekends I get a flat spot on the rear. So I just watch the "tread" and once it gets even with the rest I change it out. Now I ride with some people who try and get a couple or rides in after that, but it's just not worth it to me personally.

For the front just like Duc said watch for cupping otherwise watch the groove line too. I normally change out my front with every other rear tire, but some people I ride with change them both out at the same time.
Cupping will look obvious on each side (or one) you will see the tread go up and down as you spin the tire.
 

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One way to avoid that rear from going flat in the middle from extended highway use, or less aggressive street riding where more time is spent upright than cranked over, is to look at dual compound tires. The BT012SS features a dual compound rear featuring a harder compound center and softer compound outers to aid in tire longevity and cornering grip. I love the tires but will be trying out the Diablos I won here next; hopefully they won't flatspot like the Dragons since my riding doesn't see even use of the tire surface.
 

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Just to clarify. When the tire tread becomes flat (usually in the center first on the rear tire, and on the sides on the front tire) it has to be changed. What I mean by flat is that the tread is gone, the grooves are no longer visible, it has become a smooth surface. Thats the best way to guage wear, by how deep the grooves are of the tread. How many miles you will/should get from a tire is difficult to say. How you ride, and tire compound will make things vary. These guys mentioned other reasons to change tires, but to check the usual wear of a tire, just look at how deep the treads are.
 

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I'm one of the people who likes to change out both tires at the same time. I like to have th epiece of mind that the tire compound will be fresh front and back. Although the front tire doesn't wear down as quickly as the rear, it still has been exposed to a lot of UV light which changes the molecular structure of the compund, making the rubber itself lose grip, and elasticity. The loss of elasticity is noticable through cracking.

Besides, if you change out your tires, and try different manufacturers/compunds, it is wise to change out both tires so the bike is better planted. You also get the full beenfit of having a new rear tire...remember the front tire goes through a lot of stress every time you crank that bike over. It is responsible for all the turning, and takes on a lof wieght when you hit the brakes.

:smile:
 

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Just to add a bit.. I've noticed that when you develop that flat spot in the tires, turning/leaning can become somewhat unpredictable.
When you are riding on the flat spot (center of the tire) and start to lean the bike over for a turn, the bike has to "raise up" and over the hump created by the flat spot.

This takes more clip-on imput (effort). As soon as you are over the hump, the bike will fall over dramatically/quickly. This change in lean rate can upset the chasis and the rider.
It can be quite a frightening experience.
 

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Bike tires (just like car tires) have wear bars in the grooves at various locations. It's that little bump of rubber down in the groove, generally 3/32" tall. When the tread is worn down even with the wear bars at any location, it's time to find new rubber.

Your mileage may vary. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the reply guys. This helped allot. I still have quite a bit of life left on them but I plan to change both tires when I do because I plan to try another size (lower profile) and a different brand. I basicly don't want ot mix/match the front from the rear.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Micah said:
Thanks for the reply guys. This helped allot. I still have quite a bit of life left on them but I plan to change both tires when I do because I plan to try another size (lower profile) and a different brand. I basicly don't want ot mix/match the front from the rear.

[/ QUOTE ]

Why do you want to change to a lower profile? Front, rear or both? Generally I wouldn't recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm wanting to take a track coarse class and the stock rear tire has a huge side wall(want lower profile for rear only but will replace both at same time to make sure they work good together). I doubt I could lean far. I'm also changing the pipes and the foot peg location for same problem. Am I off on this line of thought?

I have a cheap bike and once its paid for, this is the one I would rather lay down than a newer one that I plan to buy in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
correction, stock rear is a Bridgestone BT-45

Any suggestions on tire size? I'm looking for a rear tire that does not have the large side walls that these do. The things look like something from back in the day you would see on a H.D. Need something round from rim to rim.
 

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WARNING WARNING WARNING
He's started the infamous "Which tire is the best" debate. :lol:

BTW He's got a Kawi Nin 500.
This somewhat limits his tire choices if I'm not mistaken.

How much track time vs street time for you and what's your budget?
 

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I'll be getting Sport Demons soon.
I got them in stock sizes (Which is what I'd reccomend)
110/70-17, 130/70-17.

If you go to a 120 front and a 140 rear, it will be harder to lean the bike over, and when the tires are well worn (But not due for replacement) the bike might have a tendency to fall into the corners in a way you might not like.

Because of our limitations, you can get Bridgestone Exedras (Worse than the BT-45's) Pirelli Sport Demons, Metzler 330/550's (Good tire, in my experience; but still haven't had the Sport Demons on yet) and I also believe you can get Avons in our sizing.

Just remember that just because the sidewall is taller, it doesn't mean that the tire can't all be used up. I have touched my pegs down numerous times as well as my exhaust pipe (BT-45's) and still never got all the way to the edge of the tire. Besides, it's all about how you take the turn anyways (Whether you lean into, away, or don't lean at all) :smile:

:waytogo:
 

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A lower sidewall means less cornering clearance.


[ QUOTE ]
The things look like something from back in the day you would see on a H.D. Need something round from rim to rim.

[/ QUOTE ]

Looks to me like you're more interested in style than performance. Don't use wider tires unless you're also using wider rims.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
GSRider said:
I'll be getting Sport Demons soon.
I got them in stock sizes (Which is what I'd reccomend)
110/70-17, 130/70-17.

If you go to a 120 front and a 140 rear, it will be harder to lean the bike over, and when the tires are well worn (But not due for replacement) the bike might have a tendency to fall into the corners in a way you might not like.

Because of our limitations, you can get Bridgestone Exedras (Worse than the BT-45's) Pirelli Sport Demons, Metzler 330/550's (Good tire, in my experience; but still haven't had the Sport Demons on yet) and I also believe you can get Avons in our sizing.

Just remember that just because the sidewall is taller, it doesn't mean that the tire can't all be used up. I have touched my pegs down numerous times as well as my exhaust pipe (BT-45's) and still never got all the way to the edge of the tire. Besides, it's all about how you take the turn anyways (Whether you lean into, away, or don't lean at all) :smile:

:waytogo:

[/ QUOTE ]

What he said. /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif

I had a GS once upon a time and also drug pegs and pipe and still had 1/4" chicken strips on the rear tire with both the BT45's and Michelin Macadams. Changing sizes will muck up the handling.
 
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