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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can the wheel bearings on 02 ZX9R be removed and reinstalled? Considering having the wheels chromed over the winter. Is there a trick to removing the bearing without damaging them? Have heard that once wheel bearing are removed they should be replaced is this true? :help:
 

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If you're going to the trouble of removing the bearings, you may as well replace them. I've seen some fancy bearing pullers that will bear on the outer race but those were for axle bearings in cars. I suspect they'd be too big for a bike. Go to your local auto-parts store and tell them what you want to do. They may be able to point you towards a tool that will work.
 

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I'll build on this by saying that once you have the bearings out, write down the numbers on the rim of the race and call a industry supplier like McMaster Carr or even go to the local car parts store...you'll save a TON of money over going to the bike shop and will be receiving EXACTLY the same part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for your help. I have bearing & bushing pullers but nothing that will extract the wheel bearing outer races. Was just hoping hoping I could save the bearings.
Also thanks for the tip on purchasing the bearings from an auto parts and/or bearing supplier.

Thanks :smile:
 

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Wheel bearings are easy to get out. Remove the circlip and get the kawasaki bearing puller. Its just a rod and a plug. You put the plug into the wheel into the bearing. its a cylinder with slots on both sides. one end of the rod (like a screwdriver) goes into the plug. You put the rod into the plug and give it a whack with a hammer. Out it comes. I would not re-use a bearing though. They don't cost that much anyhow..I replaced the front and rear bearings on my old ZX-9 at 40 k miles for peaace of mind. They don't last forever.
 

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my friend reused his after he had his wheels powdercoated and they bearing fried about 5k miles later , dont be cheap
 

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eScreaming Dizbuster
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[ QUOTE ]
terrasmak said:
dont be cheap

[/ QUOTE ]

Ditto.

At ronayers.com, a full set of wheel bearings and seals for that bike, not including the sprocket carrier bearing and seal, is all of $63.

It's true that you can buy generic bearings and seals, but you won't save much more than lunch money, if anything at all. What do you want your bike rolling on at 160 mph?
 

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You can get EXACTLY the same bearings...same number even the name brand could be the same if you specified it.

Just trying to save the guy some $$. I bought a bearing and seal set for my dirt bike and saved $40.00 by going through an industrial distributor.

Bearings are graded in classes like oils...if you give the supplier the size and class, even if you don't get the same manufacturer, it's the same class of bearing which means it meets an ANSI standard which means in the same application, the bearings will work the same.

Buying the "kit" is the easy way, but the guy didn't want to replace the bearings at all to begin with so I gave him a lower cost alternative.
 

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You can get better bearings cheaper by going aftermarket. Some of the bearings Kawasaki uses are not sealed at all or only on one side. By taking the bearing you removed to a industrial bearing house you can get sealed bearing for everything including the sprocket carrier. Take out the circlip and knock the bearing out with a punch. The bearing is now ruined. To replace the bearing put them in the freezer overnight. Heat up the hub with a propane torch and hammer them in using a socket that is slightly smaller the the OD of the bearing so that it only contacts the outer race. Sealed bearing usually run $7-$10 apiece.
 

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uh',.... you dont have to remove the bearings to paint the wheel. You will just have to cover the holes on both sides of the wheel. Some masking tape will cover the holes fine. You will want an exacto knife or something to cut with so you will have clean sharp lines. Just cover the holes with the tape then cut around the outside of the seal where it touches the rim. That way the seal and the hole is covered. Then paint. :waytogo:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The dealer removed the tires, seals and bearings. Tech explained most of the time they are able to extract the seals & bearing without damage to seals or bearings on newer low milage bikes.
When I ask to order replacements the service tech said they were able to remove them without any damage. Tech handed me the bearings in marked Zip-lock bags and said when the wheel are done stop back and they will reinstall the seals & bearings.
Paul's Chrome, Evans City, PA are doing the plating @ $250 per wheel.
Took a tour of the operation during which the owner said so far this year they plated about 1400 wheels. Happy not to ship the wheels accross the country or do the wheel exchange program. :grin:
 

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eScreaming Dizbuster
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The mileage of the bike doesn't alter the basic fact of wheel bearing removal. The outside diameter of the outer race is larger than the hole into which it fits. That requires considerable force to remove, which must be applied by driving on the inner race. Caught between the races are the little tiny balls, which make little tiny dents in the races. These dents cause the bearing to wear rapidly, just like Terrasmak said. At first you don't notice and will think you were clever to reuse the bearings. Then the handling will degrade gradually and have you posting questions about which steering damper is best.

I'm not going to go into the argument of original equipment versus generic bearings, except to say that being made to a minimum standard isn't always the same as being made to a specification. Even the price of original equipment is not excessive in the context of $500 chrome jobs, and the $300 or $400 worth of rubber that will be fitted.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
except to say that being made to a minimum standard isn't always the same as being made to a specification

[/ QUOTE ]

The standard IS the specification. If you are choosing a bearing, there are various classifications that determine the clearances and subsequent precision for a given class. Generally wheel bearings are a very low class (high clearance) bearing. You can get bearings that are a higher class (lower clearance higher precision) bearings for cheaper than you can buy the lower class bearings from the dealership.

We probably use the same bearings that are in your front wheel on one of our conveyors in the plant. Bearings are not designed for specific applications... i.e. motorcycle wheel, they are designed for certain conditions and loads... i.e. low rpm, dirty environment with a peak radial load of x and a peak axial load of y.

Want to learn more: SKF website

Surf a little and you can learn all you want about bearings.

The bearings in your wheels are VERY low quality as far as industry standards go. They don't have to be capable of high accuracy or able to withstand high rpm's.

We have high speed spindle bearings in CBN grinding applications that are capable of running continuously at 35,000 to 40,000 rpm with zero failures for 3-4 years. In comparison a motorcyce bearing in comparision turns approx. 194 rpm at 70 MPH...

If they drove them out of the wheel from the inner race (which they had to do to get them out), I'd replace them...if you don't you probably will in about 5k miles. Pay me now or pay me later. It's not a safety issue or anything...the bike won't come apart if you use the old bearings (for a while).
 

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I'm looking at the manual and it states, when installing the components back (bearing, seals, circlip) it has to be all new parts.

Is this true or this is just one of those make $$ scheme, but not necessary.
 
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