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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry this took so long PEM, I though I had erased the pics.

To start off if you are going to do your valve adjustment get a service manual. I would be happy to scan pages of mine and post them if needed. Triumph recomends doing the firt valve adjustment at 12,000 miles, my bike was having a hard time starting at 10 so I figured it was time. After you get all the body work, tank, and valve cover off this is what you will be looking at.



The top of the pic are the exhaust valves and the bottom are the intake. You should also take of the right hand side engine cover so you can turn the engine over with a wrench. Helps to take out the spark plugs too.


“When the dogs are looking for their bones and it’s raining ice picks on your steel shores”
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Basicly you measure the cleance between the cam and the top of the buck when the pointy part of the cam is pointed up. The manual says to do this with the engine closed. You then take these measurements on all twelve valvues and use a table in the book to pick a new shim to get the right clearance. Or you can just do a little adding and subtracting and skip the table. I don't know the correct values of clearance off hand but can look them up if need.

When I did mine the intake valves were being hung open a few thousandths (explanes the hard starting) and the exhaust were right on spec, no adjustment needed.

Now once you have figured out which shims need to be traded out It time to take stuff apart /images/icons/wink.gif.

The service manual talks about a special took for getting out the shims. I found it simpler to just unbolt the cam shaft caps just move the cam out of the way. Here is what that looks like.



“When the dogs are looking for their bones and it’s raining ice picks on your steel shores”
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Make sure you lossen the cam caps evenly all the way around, don't let one cap hold the valve spring pressure from all the valves. Same goes for tighting things up. Also do not turn the engine over with all this tuff losse, that would be very very bad. Here is a pic of one of the shims.



Once you get the new shims and cam/cams bolted back down you go back an measure the clearances again and see if you got it right. Put it all back together and your done. I did not buy any new gaskets, just used a little gasket sealer and have not had a problem.

“When the dogs are looking for their bones and it’s raining ice picks on your steel shores”
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just brining this back to the top for diesel, I will be doing mine again soon any ways.

 

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Hey, thanks bud! I had completely forgotten about it, and missed this the first time around, but then I sometimes have the attention span of a cocker spaniel. /images/icons/wink.gif

That gives me a much better idea of what I'll be looking at down the road. It doesn't look bad at all, but you're right, getting a copy of the factory service manual is essential.
 

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Thanks!

I am moving this stuff to a document I can save for the future. For some reason I have an aversion to dealers doing anything once the warrenty has expired.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I bike is under warrenty and still don't let them toutch it. Plus take it to deal for work, might get it back in 2 weeks. I do it and my bike is only down for a weekend.

 

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I was wondering if anyone has tried shims from another manufacturer. I'm doing mine tomorrow, and the Kawasaki dealer is way closer than the Triumph dealer. i know that Triumph motors are supposes to be clones of the Kawi motors, so thought the parts might interchange. Anybody know?

BTW, I've got the same situation as 3banger, tight intakes and fine exhausts. Seems awfully common.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I tried going to Kawi dealer looking for shims and from what I recall they were not the right diameter over bucket shims. Twin Peaks Power sports in longmont used to carry Triumph and the parts counter guy there used to just let me swap shims at no charge. Give them a call and see what they say, I am sure they still have there big box of shims. Erico was never quite as freindly. The problem with longmont shim bucket is it was getting low on the thinner shims. Also bring a pair of calipers or mics as a lot of the shims in the bucket have the numbers worn off. I have also bought them from jacklilley when I couldn't find thin enough ones at Twin Peaks. As for the 02 and newer bikes, I hear they have under bucket shims which means you must pull the cams. I don't know what other bikes have common shims but when I do my 02 Tona about mid summer I will put up another post. Really I need to make a web page out of this be cause it comes up every few months.
 

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Looks like I'm off to Erico then.....Twin Peaks is about the same distance and I need thin shims. Problem is that Erico is having a "dyno fest" with $20 runs. Guys will be lining up to have salespeople tell them why their bike needs more money thrown at it. Ugh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Give parts department a call just to make sure they will still let you swap before you drive out there.
 

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Having just done this, I've got some tips to add.

1. Remove the clutch cover and use the crank to turn the motor. This is way easier than using the wheel, and also allows easy access to any shims you drop down the cam chain tunnel. Also allows you to keep an eye on the timing.

2. Zip-tie all the wires and coolant hoses out of your way at the start. You'll be glad you did.

3. If you have intakes that are as tight as mine were, a .05 feeler gauge won't fit. This is the smallest size on many sets, so, either get thinner gauges or you'll be guessing at the shim sizes you need. I had to go back for more shims. Yuck.

4. Loop some safety wire around the cam chain and sprockets to keep the chain from jumping teeth and putting the timing off.

5. A little silicone sealer helps to hold the valve cover gasket in place while you put it back on. If, after the first test ride, you find oil all over the bike, you probably didn't get it on right. Ugh.

There ya go. This solved all my cold-starting problems, and so was well worth doing.
 

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why would it LOOSE clearance, shouldnt it gain clearance with wear???????
 

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Virtually all poppet valves in internal combustion engines will slowly "sink" into the valve seat over time due to the pounding, burning and general wear & tear they experience during operation. This valve recession causes clearance to decrease between the top of the valve stem and the cam or follower that works on it. The valve shim is simply a spacer that is intended to be checked and changed periodically to protect the cam lobe from excess wear as the valve sinks "up" into the seat.

Unfortunately, Triumph appears to have installed a batch of softer-than-ideal valves in some of the 955 motors. Modern high performance engines should be able to go many tens of thousands of miles farther before seeing the kind of wear 3banger and hawk and a few others have reported.
 
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