Sportbike Racing Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone reccomend someone in the area who can change tires at a resonable price. Quentin at Apex Predators has moved and BH Ducati want $120! I tell you, the times I've called that store have not left me feeling particularly impressed. Thanks. Merry Christmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Cycle parts in East Los Angeles will do them for $25.00 each. They are located fwy 60 get off in atlactic go south
in the corner of 4th and atlantic. 323-264-4107
the address is 400 S. Atlantic Blvd. LA, CA 90022 :waytogo:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
[ QUOTE ]
Pacifico said:
For about $120 you can buy everything you need to change and balance your own. Do mine a couple times a year. Time wise it takes about a 6 pack to do both.

Just a suggestion.

Pacifico

[/ QUOTE ]

As a matter of fact my friend and I just change the tires on my bike this past sat. took the tires off and took them to a shop they install the new tires did balance for just $20.00 :waytogo:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
Not that I do it (or did it) but my old bike has been known to go as fast as 170 mph. I don’t know how or have the confidence to balance my own tires. How hard is it? And how easy is it to screw up?

I’d like to do it. It would save me a ton of money. But I’m afraid I’d do it and have a tire failure at triple digits or find my wheel is out of balance. I already had a bad time with tankslappers. Come on guys build my confidence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I hear you about doing it myself, its just that I spent the money I had for stands on tires. Anyone know a good way to change the front without a stand? I remember reading someone hanging the front end from the garage roof. Where did they hook onto the bike, without the bike tipping over?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
My method is Rube Goldberg to be sure, but it works well and causes no problems that I'm aware of. I do use a rear stand. For the front I use cinder blocks with wood on top, as I pick up the front of the bike, my daughter pushes the blocks in, voila. I set it down carefully to avoid scratching the bottom of the forks - visible only by the odd ant or squirrel anyhow. I do have the ability to hoist from the ceiling in my garage but find that to be more of a PITA than the blocks. I do hoist when removing the forks though.

The balancer came as part of the tire changing set up. I've been looking for the link to the darn thing, no luck so far. I'll post it up as soon as I can find. It's a gravity balancer, using precision bearings on a suspended "H" bar. Set the tire/wheel on it, mark bottom, weight and spin til it doesn't stop at the same place twice. They claim it's many times more accurate than shop balancers which have a time factor to contend with. I'd tend to agree. Since I started changing my own - years now - the balance is consistently on, regardless of speed. Not always the case before.

The whole process requires a bit of muscle and care to not scratch things up but after the first couple changes it's really not a big deal. Make sure the tire is mounted with the rotation arrows pointing correctly though - don't ask me how I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I couldn't wait so I took the bike to M/C Tireworks in North Hills. The guy there, Eric, did a very careful job, he even spent half an hour smoothing out the front axle (it was very difficult to remove) that had been abused by the Ducati factory. Anyway he just used two regular car jacks on the front forks and it worked a treat. These would work great for the rear as well. I'll change the rear as soonas my new sprocket shows up.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top