Sportbike Racing Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as not to take BitViper's thread away from him, and hijack it, I have a question concerning suspension.

If you had a choice between shock/fork rebuild, and shock/fork revalve, which would you choose, and why???

I don't have the option to do a complete replacement unless I go with OEM parts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,036 Posts
I figure you would go with the rebuild if you found that some internal parts have worn beyond limits, and a revalve if your suspension was in good shape but you felt the need to retune it.

Have you gained much weight over the winter? What's going on? :blush:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:lol:

Nah...after 40,000 km, I think the boingers are in need of attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,036 Posts
If I ever have the forks apart on my Killer, I'll probably do the progressive spring mod. For now I'll just change the oil in the spring. The KLR is known to have a pretty dramatic nosedive under heavy braking, which the progressive springs correct.

If you're happy with the current setup on your bike, just give them a rebuild to freshen them up a bit.

EDIT: ...change the oil in the spring time , not the spring in the shock. I know there's no oil in there. Sorry for any confusion.
 

·
eScreaming Dizbuster
Joined
·
12,112 Posts
I'm pretty sure the GS has a damper-rod fork, so there is no revalving, unless you want to go with a Race Tech cartridge emulator. If the seals aren't leaking, just change the oil and you should be set. If you want to upgrade the fork, replace the springs. You can replace the bushings and damper rod seals if you want, but you shouldn't need it with that mileage. Kilometerage? /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

I'd bet a Canadian dollar that the rear shock isn't serviceable. Even so, it's a good idea to clean and grease the linkage pivots and swingarm shaft, as well as the steering bearings. If it were my bike I'd probably replace the shock, especially before spending money on weird headlights.

Dunno, you might try drilling the Killer fork caps for Schrader valves. Six or eight psi really helps the handling without hurting compliance or ride quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,036 Posts
Ah yes, I remember you mentioning that some time ago. Thanks for the reminder! Air is free, whereas progressive springs cost a bit more than "free"...

You remembered that my Killer doesn't have the Schrader valves, though. Man, how long ago was that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
[ QUOTE ]
TravellinJones said:
I'm pretty sure the GS has a damper-rod fork, so there is no revalving, unless you want to go with a Race Tech cartridge emulator. If the seals aren't leaking, just change the oil and you should be set. If you want to upgrade the fork, replace the springs. You can replace the bushings and damper rod seals if you want, but you shouldn't need it with that mileage. Kilometerage? /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

what he said.

[ QUOTE ]
I'd bet a Canadian dollar that the rear shock isn't serviceable.

[/ QUOTE ]

Nope, sure isn't.

[ QUOTE ]
Even so, it's a good idea to clean and grease the linkage pivots and swingarm shaft, as well as the steering bearings.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yep.

[ QUOTE ]
If it were my bike I'd probably replace the shock, especially before spending money on weird headlights.

[/ QUOTE ]

:lol2:

You might talk some of the guys that race them. You might find some forks or a better shock for a reasonable price.
 

·
E-Tard
Joined
·
11,817 Posts
Did you like your suspension when the bike was new? Have your abilities improved above the ability of your boingers to perform?

I believe you have the damper-rod forks like my SV (or close). I went with the RaceTech springs and Gold Valve Emulators. Absolutely love them on the track.

A rebuild wasn't really difficult and I'm glad I did it myself.

Another question you have to ask yourself is "Would the cost of completely new forks be worth the total value of the bike?" (if that made sense)
 

·
eStarbucks
Joined
·
17,313 Posts
What tools did you need to do the fork rebuild yourself?

I looked thru my Honda manual and it "looks" easy to change the springs and oil...

is it really as easy as: "take fork off one side at a time, unscrew top cap, take internals out, drain oil, re-attach top and put back on bike"?
 

·
E-Tard
Joined
·
11,817 Posts
As I remember:
A ruller in metric (mm).
Drill with bits.
Something to hammer home the fork seals. I took a piece of PVC and cut about a 8" piece. Then I cut it lengthwise so I could slide it over the slider. I wrapped tape around it so that it wouldn't expand while using it like a slide-hammer.
Worked great and cost me nada.

Allen wrenches.
Something to collect the used fork oil in for recycling.
Torque wrench.
Box end wrenches.
Screwdrivers.
A vice is extremely helpful. You need to protect the forks though so I took 2 blocks of wood and cut a "V" into each. The forks sat between the V. NEVER, EVER OVERTIGHTEN THE VICE. YOU WILL CRUSH THE FORKS.

Perminent marker.
A punch is also helpful.

A way to suspend the front end of the bike off the ground. Either a stand or tie-downs from the rafters in the garage.


I think that's about it.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top