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eARRROOOOOGA
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Yup, it's a full on slide that makes the front feel like it's tucking.

JM
 

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I'm with Crudmop--it's tires. I don't care how you ride the thing, at 30 MPH, riding style/technique will not cause the sort of traction loss you describe--unless, of course, you're doing it intentionally, in which case you'd already know why it was happening.

(Only) 3 reasons for the front to slide: 1. flat-out pace at full lean angle--which isn't the case--2. road or tire conditions--my guess--3. over- loading/weighting the front--need to get on the throttle to initiate weight transfer and maintain proper fore-aft weight balance.

If you haven't been riding the Monster for awhile, the (surface of) the tires will tend to "dry" out resulting in less available grip--especially in cooler temps. You may need to take the bike out and get the tires really warmed up--like perhaps an interstate run which would offer prolonged elevated speed--to try to bring the oils back to the surface followed by some cornering to try to open the grain back up. I know that, back in the day, when starting practice on last month's race tires, it always took some extra time/laps to get the things back working as they should--just had to get them good and warm and (surface) pliable again.
 

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eARRROOOOOGA
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Ok folks, here's the verdict from my non-trackday educated riding style.

The Hawk made me do it.

Yup.

It's the Hawk's fault.

This weekend, the Hawk's light weight, forgiving suspension, and superb flickibility gave me some new confidence.

Details at 11.

JM
 

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Two things:

Duc--anytime you wanna ride down here for a couple days you have a crash point (no not literally!)

JM-Maybe you shouldn't steal my ride...Molly might be angry and she's faking you out--oh you wanna ride her bike...I'll show you *slide..save...made you look :lol
 

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Duc--anytime you wanna ride down here for a couple days you have a crash point (no not literally!)
:waytogo

JM-Maybe you shouldn't steal my ride...Molly might be angry and she's faking you out--oh you wanna ride her bike...I'll show you *slide..save...made you look :lol
:lol

That's what happened with my first bike. The wife wanted me to get the yellow. I got the red. The red tried to put me in the ground. I ended up with the yellow 6 months later. :banghead :smirk
 

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That's the power of the wives..mwahahahah :lol
 

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eARRROOOOOGA
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I'll be right down. :lol
Come on down. I'll drive you nuts parking it in left-handers :lol



1st thing: Everyone on here that offered a solution mentioned part of the problem. It wasn't simply one thing. It was a combination of things.

1. It started with me riding the Hawk. The forgiving suspension & frame coupled with the low seat height and low center of gravity compared to the SS and the Monster allowed me push limits I hadn't pushed before. I had the Hawk on a technical road with rough, broken pavement with lots of irregularities. It's a place I've scrubbed many a mile off many tires.

2. The 900SS has new tires. A nice clean, unmarred page upon which to wreck havoc upon unsuspecting rubber. Just like the new rear and barely used front found on the Hawk. Possibly why I didn't notice any concerning differences from railing the Hawk Sunday and commuting on the 900SS the following Monday. That's a good thing for the new tires on the 900SS.

3. As suspected more than once, some blame falls on the Monster's well used tires. The pictures will explain.

4. Confidence and riding style learned from the Hawk did not translate well to the "old habits" worn tires on Molly. Once again, the pictures will explain.

Here's the gory pictorial details.

1. Front tires. I never scrub them to the edge it seems.



The things I learned riding the Hawk helped me achieve a greater lean angle. That lean angle put me right on the shoulder of the worn v. new part of the front tire. The combination of hitting that shoulder and on the unscrubbed side of that shoulder caused alarm. Two things caused alarm. Slippage from hitting unscrubbed tire AND the sudden tip-in from crossing the shoulder from well-worn to untouched.

I now understand and I have learned.

2. Exact same scenario to a smaller extent happened with the rear tire.



Exactly as above with the front, BUT I'm used to the rear sliding because of the condition of the rear tire. Also, due to the flatter profile of the rear tire, the transition from worn to not worn wasn't as extreme as on the front tire.

That is why the front felt like it was sliding into a tuck.

Thanks for to all the things mentioned by EVERYONE that contributed to this thread, I have a greater understanding of motorcycling.

This is why we have a motorcycling forum :waytogo I'm thankful for everyone's input and comments. I have learned something because of all the clues given in this thread :grin

JM
 

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So you were hitting the peak from normal wear to unused tire...that's a fun transition isn't it? :grin The 6R front has that wear pattern and on one ride I seemed to hover around the peak and on the next outing I found myself pushing beyond it. That brief "I'm falling" sensation quickly settles and the bike settles in nicely in the turn. Odd but fun. :)

I can always use more practice in left handers. And the way you scoot around two-up I'm sure you'll school me (I'll bring my GS :lol) riding solo. :)
 

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eARRROOOOOGA
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So you were hitting the peak from normal wear to unused tire...that's a fun transition isn't it? :grin
I'll add the road was cold and wet the morning I slid at 30mph too. That made that transition to across the wear shoulder right onto untouched rubber a very slippery one! :shocked That'll make you feel like you're crashing right quick like :lol

I can always use more practice in left handers. And the way you scoot around two-up I'm sure you'll school me (I'll bring my GS :lol) riding solo. :)

Ever since my GSXR-totaling crash in '03 I've had issue with left-handers. I'm getting better, but I'm still not good at picking a line and getting on the throttle. I pick a decent line, but then I'm afraid to twist the throttle. So, the friction of cornering slows the bike, I lean a bit lower than I anticipated and run tight, then I have to correct my line.

Molly is easier to ride fast 2-up :lol Having a passenger allows me to twist with throttle hard exiting turns with much less worry about making the rear tire pass the front :lol

JM
 

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I was the same way but I've been forcing myself to work on them with each outing. I make a point to start as far right as possible and run as deep as possible. My lefts are alot better now.
 

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eARRROOOOOGA
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I'm working on those too, and I'm almost evened out my chicken strips :lol The Hawk has been a big help with left handers as well as overall.

JM
 

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And that's what the smaller bikes are good for. Confidence is a mental thing and can carry over to the other bikes relatively easy.
 
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