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ehasbeen
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If you desire to learn to race and be the best possible I would say give it a try. However, if not there's really now reason. Most racers use the reverse pattern but not all. For instance Mat Mladin doesn't seem to need it.

Adv. - grab an upshift moments earlier coming out of a left handed corner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was told by someone that once they became adjusted to it, they didn't understand why it wasn't a standard feature on all bikes.

In reality though, you're right, if you're not racing, I can't see any reason to spend money on a mod like that.

I wonder if any knows if the reverse pattern was ever a standard feature on any production street bike?
 

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eStarbucks
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[ QUOTE ]
indianaroadracer said:
Adv. - grab an upshift moments earlier coming out of a left handed corner.

[/ QUOTE ]

Also... stomping the lever also gives a more positive up-shift.

On a CBR929/954 the mod is cheap and easy... Get a shift lever from a VFR - et vola! A reverse shifter!
 

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I am running GP shifting on my Duc, which this past year has pretty much been on the track only. Pretty easy mod on the 999 - remove the stock linkage and use a regular shift lever on the shaft. I find that upshifting is easier and more positive and for me, eliminated false neutrals. It is easier to preload the lever for clutchless shifting as well. All of the rest of my bikes are regular shift. I haven't had any problems going back and forth.
 

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i know on the buell, it would take five minutes to change the pattern to, up once into 1st, and then down to 2 3rd 4 and 5. and not cost you a dime.

if youve ever gone for an upshift and damn near lost your foot when your toe catches the pavement and gets ripped back, thats where it would be nice
 

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I did it on mine and it was about $30 for all new parts (VFR shifter, rubber, bolt). I love it, but my feet are kind of small (9.5), so it's just a hair short for me, but I'm used to it now. Here's a pic...
 

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E-Tard
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I have it on both my Duc and the SV. It was a little tough to get adjusted to at first but, you can your family jewels into the gas tank a few times and the learning curve goes up in a hurry.

When I've got my gearing wrong for a particular track, it allows me to shift without getting my toe under the shifter (like when in a corner). I know, I know, shifting mid-corner is a no no.

I agree with the positive upshifts.
It's also a great theft deterent. Immagine the punk steaing your bike trying to shift into 1st gear and is actually in 6th. :lol:

Might either give you/someone else a chance to catch the little bastard or he might give up all together out of fright. :grin:
 

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Put the Vortex rear sets on my 1000RR and have been using the GP style for about a month. Definitely more positive when doing clutchless upshifts but my balls are still sore from that learning curve :grin:
 

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eClogs
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I've had it on my last 5 bikes, wouldn't want it any way else...
 

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How tough mentally is it to switch between GP pattern and conventional? You have two bikes, one race, one street any problems going from one to the other? I wanted to flip patterns on the ZX10 but didn’t because my buddies often let me ride their conventional shift bikes. I didn’t want to kill their confidence in me by stalling their bike because I screwed up shifting.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
evander said:
How tough mentally is it to switch between GP pattern and conventional?

[/ QUOTE ]

Personally, as long as I'm thinking about it, I can manage OK, but the moment I stop thinking about it--like when I'm just thinking about riding/going fast--I'm f*cked:

Early on in my reverse shift pattern days, I kept my bike in race trim between monthly races and instead rode my (at the time) GFs standard shift bike on the street. The following race, I worked to pass a guy for half a lap before getting underneath him at turn 2 when I promptly realized I'd upshifted to 4th instead of the desired downshift to 2nd, about broke my toe on the pavement trying to shift down to 2nd, and was cursing my stupidity as I watched him jump away off the corner :808993-banghead:.

I remember going out to the Harley/Buell tent and demo riding a Buell Lightning after race practice at Daytona one year. 1/2 hour earlier I was turning laps reverse-shift, then hopped on the standard shift Lightning and headed out on the demo tour. Came out of a left-hand sweeper on the throttle in 4th, went to hit an upshift to 5th and dropped it into 3rd instead; the bike--with that hotted-up Harley motor--went into immediate cardiac arrest, locked, slid, and slithered the rear for about 25 feet before I could pull the clutch back in. Kept it out of oncoming traffic, but that was enough of that.

I didn't want to cut the rad hose on my 600RR in order to flip the linkage, so I decided on rearsets instead. I wanted the Sato's, but I had to wait a couple months for the first production run. I managed with the standard shift pattern, but it wasn't fun; even after 2 months of shifting with the standard pattern, I'd still catch myself out, but I had no problems going back to reverse shifting when I got my rearsets.

When I take the (present) GF's 250 Ninja out, I can manage OK, but I still have to employ a few "tricks" to help myself along. Everytime I get ready to slow for a stop, I make a point of putting my foot on top of the shifter right away, as a reminder to shift down while slowing; once I'm stopped, I leave my boot there so I know to shift down into first, and once I start upshifting, I typically leave my toe under the shifter the whole time. Though, like I said, the second I stop thinking about shifting and focus on just riding, I screw up, but that's just me, and I'm stupid like that :smirk:.

PS--another nice thing I've found about reverse shifting that hasn't been mentioned is downshifting. When hard on the brakes all your body's momentum and weight are carried forward against the tank/bars, and hooking your toe under the shifter for the downshifts just seems to work easier/more naturally than having to push down against the force shoving you forward on the bike.

PPS--In addition to Matt Mladin (who apparently has a bad ankle from a crash years ago and finds standard shifting more amenable to his condition), Kevin Schwantz used/uses a standard shift pattern as well. :waytogo:
 

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[ QUOTE ]
evans2583 said:
I was told by someone that once they became adjusted to it, they didn't understand why it wasn't a standard feature on all bikes.

In reality though, you're right, if you're not racing, I can't see any reason to spend money on a mod like that.

I wonder if any knows if the reverse pattern was ever a standard feature on any production street bike?

[/ QUOTE ]


In teh early 70's it was standardized with all makes. Left foot shift, 1 down 2nd and higher up. Before that every bike was different. Some were right foot shifted, some suicide jockeys (coming back with high end cruisers) and the only street bike I know of that came with down for an upshift a Suzuki rotary shift. There was no downshift. it went 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Couldnt go 5 to 4 in one step. Had to go to 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 before you let the clutch go.
 
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