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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone Know what the initial sag and rider sag on the new 02 r1 is? I've been getting a little head shake around 5000rpm and up and was informed that i might need to re-adjust my rider sag and or decompression.
 

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I believe, and I'm by no means an expert, but you have to measure the bike completely unloaded and off the ground, and then measure it with you on it, in what you usually wear for gear. Then subract one from the other and I believe this is the sag you should adjust the bike to so that the distance you get from the equation is what the bike will read with you just sitting on it... Or something to that effect.

Hopefully someone can add to my theory though.
 

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from http://www.biketweakers.com

Setting Static Sag

The following is a simple "how-to" guide that should help in setting your static sag. These numbers should work for most any sportbike, although you should check your shop manual for any recommended settings.


FRONT SAG
1.
Place a ty-wrap around your fork tube just above the dust cap (or just below depending on what type of forks you have). Make it snug but not too tight so it can move freely but stay in place.
2. Sit on the bike (in full gear for exact measurement) with someone holding it up in the riding position. This will move the ty-wrap up (or down) to its most compressed position.
3. Get off the bike (easy), put down sidestand, pull the bike towards you and back so the front wheel is off the ground (you can do this with a little practice) and have someone measure the distance between the ty-wrap and the dust cover.
4. This measurement is your front sag based upon your weight. It should be ~34mm-38mm (34-track 38-street).
5. Adjust your front preload as needed to make this correct (see owner's manual).

REAR SAG
1. Place a small piece of tape on the side of your tail section (sprocket side) straight up from your rear axle. This will be your reference point so make sure it is as straight up/down from the axle as possible and maybe mark a dot or something with a pen for accuracy.
2. Sit on the bike (in full gear for exact measurement) with someone holding it up in the riding position.
3. Have someone measure the distance from the marker down to the rear axle.
4. Get off the bike (easy), put down the sidestand, pull the bike towards you and forward so the rear wheel is off the ground (you can do this with a little practice) and have someone measure the distance from the marker down to the rear axle.
5. Subtract the first measurement from the second measurement and that is your rear sag based upon your weight. It should be ~26mm-32mm (26-track 32-street).
6. Adjust your rear preload as needed to make this correct (see owner's manual).

If the ideal sag measurement is unachievable (your too heavy) then you might consider upgrading your springs, valves, oil or replacing the forks or shock. See your local suspension shop for upgrade recommendations.

All props go out to Gary Jaehne (AFM #12) for teaching me this stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
R1 specs ahhhhhh. I just want it to be perfect. Guess ill just try everything I can.
 
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