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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to set my sag. I'm just want to make sure I'm doing it right. Is the 30-32mm after you get off of the bike and measure, or do you have to lift the suspension up and then measure? Meaning you need to get 2 buddies to pull up on the handlebars.

Also when adjusting the rear spring, do you guy just use a punch and hammer or do you have the propper tools?

Live each day as it comes, there may be no tomarrow. Ride hard, ride fast, and have fun.
 

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It's 30 to 32mm (or 25 to 35 on a scale of track only to cross-country touring) between sitting on the bike and having two friends lift it up.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I allways thought that my sag setting were going to be pretty close to the 32 from the factory, based on the fact that I only weigh 163 pounds with all of my gear on. But the brisk ride I had Saturday made me start to question my current suspension settings.

Tell me if I'm wrong. On Sat I was starting a pretty hard drive off of a turn and had a mild-medium tankslapper with my old suspension settings (being to soft up front)did this kind of soft suspension up front helped me? So if I tighten up the front will it make it more prone to getting the front lighter making it more tankslapper prone? Or will properly adjusting the the rear shock kind of neutralize the situation?

If I would turn in the Compression 1/4 turn in the rear will that limit the amount of squat; thus making the front stick better?

Also some of you Suzuki guys what sag setting are you currently using?

Live each day as it comes, there may be no tomarrow. Ride hard, ride fast, and have fun.
 

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Assuming a smooth road and smooth throttle, I doubt that the adjusting the front either way would have helped in that situation....but... adjust the front and rear to the same sag numbers and make it about 30mm and make sure that both fork legs are at the same settings (mine were off from eachother when the bike was new) and it should help.

Compression damping will have minimal effect in that situation on a smooth road.
If the road is bumpy, then yes, it may help, or if the rebound was too high, it may have caused a problem. This could go for the front end as well.
NOTE* You can get similar problems from having the compression way too high as you can from having it way too low.

NOTE 2* There is always the possability that it was rider error or rider tension that caused the problem too.

BTW/ this is no longer a "quick" question. LOL

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the good advice JXL. That really helped out. The road I usally ride is a pretty bumpy and has quite a bite of black snakes (the using of tar to cover up cracks in the road) on it.

You can read all the articals about suspension settings and stuff, but it's hard to go out and set compression and rebound without fully understanding how they work and most importantly how these changes will affect your bike.

Live each day as it comes, there may be no tomarrow. Ride hard, ride fast, and have fun.
 
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