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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my forks back from RaceTech...and as I was handeling my new forks I had two questions come to mind.....

1. are they already adjusted..re-bound and pre load
2. when I rock them from side to side I can hear fluid moving around..Is that normal?

I got no instructions from them so Im kinda in the dark
 

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[ QUOTE ]
1. are they already adjusted..re-bound and pre load


[/ QUOTE ] Yes, they are, but not for you.
You will need to set your sag, preload and rebound. You must set your sag before anything else!
Realize that rebound and preload will change depending on where you are riding (bumpy street vs track vs smooth street...) Seasonal temperatures will also make a difference.

[ QUOTE ]
2. when I rock them from side to side I can hear fluid moving around..Is that normal?

[/ QUOTE ]

What weight oil did you have them use? I would think that the viscosity would be too heavy to get a good listen, but there is free air within the forks. So, i would think that you would hear the oil to some degree.
You probably won't hear this when you get the forks on the bike (rocking the bike back and forth).

If you need instructions for adjustment (sag/preload/rebound) just PM me and I will hook you up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok thats what I thought...thats no problem
You know....they only specify "light 2 pt REBUILD"

[ QUOTE ]
but there is free air within the forks

[/ QUOTE ]

I never knew that....learning somthing everyday on ESportBikes....yeah...when I invert the forks back and forth I can hear the fluid inside splashing around...

I may hi you up for thoes instructions but ill do that tomorrow...Im just gonna get them back on the bike tonight

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
From RaceTech...PreLoad comes set..but I have to set the sag....

Race Tech's method of setting front sag.....


Step 1: Extend the fork completely and measure from the wiper (the dust seal atop the slider) to the bottom of the triple clamp (or lower fork casting on inverted forks; Figure 2). This measurement is L1.

Step 2: Take the bike off the sidestand, and put the rider on board in riding position. Get an assistant to balance the bike from the rear, then push down on the front end and let it extend very slowly. Where it stops, measure the distance between the wiper and the bottom of the triple clamp again. Do not bounce. This measurement is L2.

Step 3: Lift up on the front end and let it drop very slowly. Where it stops, measure again. Don't bounce. This measurement is L3. Once again, L2 and L3 are different due to stiction or drag in the seals and bushings, which is particularly high for telescopic front ends.

Step 4: Just as with the front, halfway between L2 and L3 is where the sag would be with no drag or stiction. Therefore L2 and L3 must be averaged and subtracted from L1 to calculate true spring sag: static spring sag = L1 - [(L2 + L3) / 2].

Step 5: To adjust sag use the preload adjusters, if available, or vary the length of the preload spacers inside the fork.

Street bikes run between 25 and 33 percent of their total travel, which equates to 30 to 35mm. Roadrace bikes usually run between 25 and 30mm. This method of checking sag and taking stiction into account also allows you to check the drag of the linkage and seals. It follows that the greater the difference between the measurements (pushing down and pulling up), the worse the stiction. A good linkage (rear sag) has less than 3mm (0.12") difference, and a bad one has more than 10mm (0.39"). Good forks have less than 15mm difference, and we've seen forks with more than 50mm. (Gee, I wonder why they're harsh?) It's important to stress that there is no magic number. If you like the feel of the bike with less or more sag than these guidelines, great. Your personal sag and front-to-rear sag bias will depend on chassis geometry, track or road conditions, tire selection and rider weight and riding preference.

Using different sag front and rear will have a huge effect on steering characteristics. More sag on the front or less sag on the rear will make the bike turn more quickly. Less sag on the front or more sag on the rear will make the bike turn more slowly. Increasing sag will also decrease bottoming resistance, though spring rate has a bigger effect than sag. Racers often use less sag to keep the bike higher off the ground for more ground clearance, and since roadracers work with braking and steering forces greater than we see on the street, they require a stiffer setup. Of course, setting spring sag is only the first step of dialing in your suspension, so stay tuned for future articles on spring rates and damping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DOH! ...now that I think about it...thres no way they could set sag....they dont have the bike or me.....Pre-load they could set just knowing their springs and the weight I supplied....

Sometimes I such a ....
 
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