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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok here is the deal, I have always loved the R6 and I plan to pick up a 99-01 R6. I have no riding experience except a few rounds in a parking lot in my friends 96 ZX6-R. I have read the posts from many vetran riders warning about getting a 600 Sportsbike as a frist bike. My friends most of them last summer all bought 600z as first bikes. I understand the potential of a bike such as the R6 and I plan to respect that. I do also plan to take the Safety course. My question is even if I plan to ride safly and respect the bike for its power is it still a very bad idea to start out with this bike? Is is really possible to get a R6 and still be safe? I really appreciate the feedback and also appreciate the concern of many vetran riders, some of your post really hit me and made me think twice. Its also just I don't want to be the only one riding a 250 when all my friends are on 600.
 

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Well, is it used? Is it new?

Because one things for sure... you're gonna drop it. And if it's new... well it's really gonna suck.

And I would still recommend a 250. Who cares if you're other friends are on 600's. Unless you are absolutely sure you can handle the 600 and are willing to stake your life on it (you never know if you will), then stick with the 600. Otherwise, go the 250 route.

But I commend you on taking the Safety course. There are many guys who claim to have taken it... but their riding habits reflect otherwise. Or maybe they need to take it again.

 

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Ah yes, that is very good reading. I highly recommend you read and absorb every bit of it.

So get rid of all the useless info in your head (like wedding anniversaries, how many wedgies you got in sixth grade, etc.) and replace them with this fountain of knowledge.

What are you doing still reading this? Go and read what jabuan posted right now!

 

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i'll tell you one thing though...i learned on an R6. it's all about control. cuz anybody can wack open a throttle.

 

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be smart and safe, any questions- just post here and we'll all help you out. the r6 is fine to start with, it's hte cream of the crop for 600s and i would have gotten it if i coul dhave afforded it. that said, i also would have killed myself already, and before that i would have lost a couple of hundred from my little slide out. save money and get good equipment-leathers, helmet, gloves, boots. take the safety course to get your license, then a track school to make you better. i'm still tryin to afford all of that and that's why a i got a f3 for my first bike. droppin it sucked for sure, but i would have been MUCH more peeved if i had spend about 5000 more on my firstbike. think about it. the r6 is a bit less forgiving than an f3 because you're speed is that much higher, i've had some close calls but only through my own stupidity, that's why i reitterate,stay safe and keep it under control.
 

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It really depends on your natural born abilities when it comes to anything that has engine and wheel(s). Some people are never meant to be riding/driving even if they started on a moped or a go cart. You MUST take the course BEFORE you buy the bike. It will give you a better indication of how will you do when you do get your bike. There were people in the course with me that should have no business sitting on a bike, much less riding it. If you buy your bike first BEFORE you take the course, you might be tempted to go rideing with your friends when you are not close to being ready and the next thing you know, you might wake up in a hospital, or not wake up at all.

Starting out on a 600 is fine as long as you progress accordingly....course, bike, practice in parking lots and neighborhood streets, short distances outside of your neighborhood, longer distances etc. If you do it any other way, your chances of screwing up increases.

I started out with the course first, then waited 7 months before I got my first bike, a YZF600R. I am progressing nicely. I was voted by the instructors at the course as the most improved rider from the beginning to the end of the course... from not knowing how to shift at all to passing the class comfortably. You don't have to start with a 250, but make sure you tkae the course first and get all the riding gears. If it seems like I talked about the course too much, it's for a reason, to drill it in your head. ride safe!!!

 

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a 600 is alot for a firt bike, but it's the most u need. it really doesn't matter if u have a 250, or a 600, either one will get u killed. the 600 will just be harder not to get killed on.

<font color=blue>2001 R6<font color=blue>
<font color=blue>The Blue one Is Faster<font color=blue>/images/icons/cool.gif
 

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<blockquote><font size=1>In reply to:</font><hr>

either one will get u killed

<hr></blockquote>


I think you need to change "will" to "could."

 

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aye, you're going to drop it. There is no doubt or question, you WILL drop it.

Buy a used bike.

"With Dr. Boogie, the diagnosis is always funk!"
 

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Everything said above is accurate.

You should consider looking at older 500s (and 600s) rather than 250s. Why? Highway speeds. A Ninja 500/EX-500 still has enough oomph left to pass cars. A 250 might be completely tapped out. If you look at less powerful bikes, try to get a bike with 17" wheels so you can get modern tires.

Consider a bike with less plastic (SV or Ninja 500R) so if/when you do drop the bike it will cost less to repair. Fairings on a sportbike can cost $1000 to replace. You will be maneuvering a 400 - 500 pound object with a 2 foot square footprint around a parking lot with oil, antifreeze, and water on it. You might drop it.

While I hope this becomes your life-long passion, it might not. Buying a used or less expensive bike means you don't have to feel bad if you get out of the sport in a year. I'm blown away by guys who drop almost $10,000 (or more) on an activity they've never done before. Cheaper bikes don't lose their re-sale value as quickly. Buy a mid-90s Yamaha Seca II drive it 10,000 miles and sell it for $300 less than you paid. That will let you know if you like the sport without getting creamed on the "entry fee."

Less sporty bikes from the EX-500 to the YZF-600R are more comfortable for longer riders. Maybe 20 minute track sessions are not in your immediate future but 500 mile runs are. The more comfortable you are, the less tired you are. The less tired you are, the better you will ride. I know guys who have to stop every 30 minutes while they ride. That's a lot of time lost from riding.

Finally remember that the RIDER not the bike is usually the limiting factor in the twisties. On my rides, I usually sit on the tails of the 600s (or even in front of them) for the entire day. There is one local guy on a 600 who runs with the 1000 cc bikes the entire day. One guy I rode with an R1 told me how proud he was to run Willow Springs sitting on the tail of a GSXR-600 piloted by a much better rider than he was.
 

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I ride an F3 and ride with Liter bikes all day long. A 600 will be more than enough bike for you but to be completely honest...if you are an idiot, any bike is too much bike. Be careful and be smart. You ARE going to drop it. It will cost a WHOLE LOT of MONEY to replace broken plastics on a newer full fairing bike. My F3 got knocked over in a parking lot and the repair was $3500. (It wasn't only plastics. Some controls and a swingarm too.) I learned on a ZX7R. If you have some athletic ability and understand what it takes to pilot a powerful vehicle, then a 600 will be a good bike. My fiancee has no athletic ability whatsoever and I am making her start on a 250.

The choice is yours, respect the bike, a 250/600/1000 all flatten exactly the same when ran over by a truck. Be careful, watch out for the other idiot drivers on the road and WELCOME TO THE FAMILY!

Objects in mirror are RAPIDLY getting SMALLER!
'98 Smokin Joe F3 - Miguel Duhamel rocks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I really apprecite all your advice and opinions, after thinking about this and talking with a few of my other friends, I have been thinking maybe a older 600 such as a 96 or 97 ZX6-R, They seem to be my favorite and most comfortable 600 after the R6, the only other issue with the R6 is also insurance I heard it is much much more on a R6 then a older bike such as the 96 or 97 Ninja. I am only 21 but I do have a clean record.
 

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i'm a new rider w/ an ex500.
i'd recommend:
1. take the msf course (i learned a lot of things)
2. look at mid-90's bike (something u won't be too afraid to drop, like i did)
3. learn on it (this means leaning, braking, etc., not just going up and down the freeway)
4. then re-evaluate
u can always buy the r6 later.
i don't see a reason to rush into it.
don't worry about what other people think (my friends half-jokingly make fun of my "little" bike too).
 

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I had a ninja 500 for about 9 months, and then moved up to my CBR F4i. The 500 was good to learn on because it did nt have too much power so i was able to concentrate on building my skills and not harnessing the power of a modern 600, while trying to learn to ride well at the same time. I am glad that i waited to get my 600, but if you dont want to wait i would get an older one. It will be cheaper to insure by quite a bit.

redCBR


Fly N LOW
 

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In addition to the Yamaha Seca II, consider a Suzuki Bandit 600. It only has a bikini fairing (no plastic to break when you drop it) and it has enough power to keep you interested when your skills and confidence improve. You can get a used one cheap and cheap to insure.
 

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what type of riding are you planning on doing? any twisties at all? if so, start out smaller. here's why...

if you start out on an R6 (or a ZX6 take your pick), and start riding the twisties, more than likely you are gonna be careful. let's hope so anyhow. however, no matter how careful you are gonna be, your learning curve is going to be much flatter. in other words, the improvement in your riding won't shoot up quickly. why? because the capabilities of an R6 is waaaayyyy beyond your reach. it's way beyond many of our reaches really. it's a cutting edge superbike with lights. one wrong newbie move (such as accidentally giving it too much throttle mid corner) can send your butt flyin thru the air. who knows though? you could end up strafin the twisties with the best of them, but more than likely you'll have a hard time. with a less capable bike, it'll be more forgiving to newbie mistakes.

i started riding on a 1980 GS450L. most ev'ryone i was riding with were on VFR750's, Superhawks, Concours's, etc. i rode this bike for a year and approximately 11k miles. i learned how to really push that bike, and i mean PUSH. from there, i stepped up to a Radian 600. then onto a zx6 and now an SV650. sure, i drooled over the latest sportbikes when i first started riding too, but they will ALWAYS be around. but since i didn't start out on a 600 sportbike, i'm so much better of a rider because of that.

i understand this doesn't fit ev'rybody, but i think if more people would've started out much smaller on a less capable machine, they'd be better off.

okay, i'm done. /images/icons/laugh.gif that's my 2 cents, even if i am just a lowly sportbike girl..../images/icons/wink.gif

 

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Hey Silver, my first time on a bike was a 2001 R6. So it can be done. But no one is saying I'm sane either so take it for what it's worth.
 

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yeah, i learned on a bandit 600. great bike to start and damn cheap to insure. hell, they even have enough power to throttle wheelie in first if you try real hard. heheh.
i set mine down real slow at a light and did nothing other than sheer off the turn signal and brake lever ball. *shrug* would've been worse with a full fairing. they also have a much more relaxed seating position than superbikes. going from the zx-9r to the bandit feels like im getting on a chopper. /images/icons/smile.gif

oh yeah, i just happen to know someone selling a bandit. /images/icons/wink.gif

"2nd place is the 1st place loser." -- Origin Ambiguous
 
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