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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, just curious, how big a difference will lowering links make on an otherwise stock bike (1997 ZX-9R)? I'm thinking about dropping it 1"-2" with lowering links before my first trip to the drag strip.

BTW - Thanks for the launching tips in the other post, I would really HATE to loop my bike. I'd rather have slower hole shots!

High speed slows time - go fast, stay young!
http://home.satx.rr.com/jroberts
 

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The Links do help a lot.. I have a 99 R1 that has a 2 position " bone " stock and 3 inch lower.. I can cut high 1.6's 60 foots, and the bike is a lot easier to handle. It doesnt want to wheelie bad at all with it droped. Another idea is a strap on the front end to take the travel away on the front end. this is a quick cheap way of helping the wheelie situation,but i personaly believe in slamming the bike.. 10.29 @ 136 with a 235 pound rider

What doesnt kill me.... hurts real bad
 

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I concur. Good advice up there. /images/icons/smile.gif




BA
"<font color=blue>How about never, is never good for you??</font color=blue>"
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey, I just machined myself a set of lowering links (Muzzy does not make them for my bike). I used 0.19" thick aluminum plate, anyone know if that will be strong enough? I noticed the stock plates are about that thickness, but they seem to be steel, not aluminum.

Einstein says high speed slows time, so go fast, stay young!
http://home.satx.rr.com/jroberts
 

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my 6r, 9r and 12r all used aluminum dog-bones, of fairly stiff variety. When a friend made a set out of steel, they were only about half - 3/4 as thick and they were just fine.

I think you'll be perfectly fine.




BA
"<font color=blue>How about never, is never good for you??</font color=blue>"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Big Al, I think it will be OK too. I will keep an eye on them just in case.

You know, I could build a solid model in Pro/ENGINEER and run a finite element analysis on them to see what the stress level is... naaaaaah!

Einstein says high speed slows time, so go fast, stay young!
http://home.satx.rr.com/jroberts
 

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When swapping metals, it's important to not allow dis-similar metals to touch one another. No alum. to steel or over time they'll weld themselves together.

Just my $.02

What grade aluminum did you use?

-Happiness is handing the punk-thug-wannabe & his new top-shelf machine their asses in the twisties.
 

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I wish lowering the TLR would help it seems it just allows the bike and myself to be closer to the ground when the front wheel comes up!!! I have made a set of wheelie bars for it, do you guys know the restrictions on using them at a track?

 

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There are no restrictions for wheelie bars. You will however need a strut to replace the stock shock. If you have rear suspension,it will hurt more than help. It will blow the tire away if you hit a bump.

 

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Lowering links have helped greatly! From 1.8-1.9's to 1.67-1.75's. ALTHOUGH..........Front suspension changes were also made!

Hope This Helps!


Johnny
Team No Limit Racing
http://www.teamnolimitracing.com

One Person Can Effect Change....Yet It Takes Many To Carry It Out!
 

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Lowering links just lower the front, correct?

So I imagine that you have to loosen the front clamps and lower the front that way, right?

Too bad there isn't some easier way for the front... or is there for a 12R?

 

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not sure if you had a typo there Shaft, but the lowering links, like pictured above, are for the back only. They are part of the rear shock support. (One for each side)

There are 3 ways to lower the front.
1. Strap it. (the strap is used to compress the front susp. and make it stay compressed while drag racing.
2. Adjust preload setting. (not a lot of gain here.)
3. Loosen triple clamps, and bring the fork-tubes up through the clamps the desired amount.

I like to support the front of the bike with a hoist when messing with the fork tubes. (rear of bike is on a stand)




BA
"<font color=blue>I see your lips moving, but it doesn't sound like English.</font color=blue>"
 

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Thanks BigAl...

Two questions...
How do you strap the front suspension?
and
Do you need some special "strap" or just something like a tiedown?

Thanks man!

 

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And remember that if you slide the forks up too far in the clamps, you run the risk of hitting the fender on the bottom clamp when you hit a bump or land a wheelie. Not a good thing. Strapping the front does not pose this problem.

 

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man Shaft, if I had a nickel for everytime I've answered the "strap" question!!

The Strap is similar to a "tie-down" with one major difference. The ends are not hooks! The hooks are replaced with a sort of small metal brackets with a bolt hole in them.
The bracket is intended to be bolted to somewhere down around the front wheel area. Most people use one of the bolts that holds the Caliper in place. You pull the bolt out, put the bracket in place, then put the bolt back and tighten her down.
You run the strap up in line with the forks (roughly) and then up and over the frame just to the rear of the steering head. (right in front of the gas tank).
Then you bring the strap down the other side and attach it with the other caliper bolt.

You MUST ensure that the strap is run UNDER any wiring as you bring it up over the frame. You don't want to bind anything.

The strap is then cinched down, just like a tie-down. It helps to have a friend, or a technique like rolling forward, stabbing the front brake so that the suspension compresses WHILE you're cinching the strap. makes it much easier and you'll get more lowering that way.

When you're done racing, just remove the strap.

It helps keep those launch wheelies down quite a bit! (except for bikes like the R1 which just have a terminal problem!) /images/icons/wink.gif /images/icons/laugh.gif

OFG is right, but don't be confused. Strapping is left for the track only. Lowering the Triple Tree clamps is best left for permanent, partial lowering because the rider is short. It's not something you do just for the track, nor should it be done much more than an inch. (going more increases the risk that OFG mentioned)
Both will give you clearance problems though. Coming down from a wheelie when you're strapped is almost a gaurantee that something is going to touch your fender. :) It's just a touch though, no damage should be incurred. My fender has a spot rubbed through the paint. /images/icons/laugh.gif /images/icons/laugh.gif




BA
"<font color=blue>I see your lips moving, but it doesn't sound like English.</font color=blue>"
 

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I've got a question for you, BigAl. Does the strap make it difficult to turn the bike? I'd hate to not be able to make the turn onto the return road after my run. Or does it just act like a poor man's steering damper?

 

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YES! It definitely makes it a bit tougher to turn at the end of the track!!! It does feel like there's a steering dampner on there, and that it's set to T I G H T!! It's like there's resistance in there when the strap is tied down!



BA
"<font color=blue>I see your lips moving, but it doesn't sound like English.</font color=blue>"
 

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Have you seen the trick some of the works motocross bikes were using for starts? Sort of a latch -n- tab setup on the fork guards that automaticaly disengages when they either take a hit, or brake hard for the first turn. Pretty sneaky...

 
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