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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently was given a 91 zx-6 that hasn't been running for a few years. I don't know too much about mechanics but can pick things up fairly easy. Battery is now good, plugs are sparking, starter is spinning, and the bike will run with carb cleaner/starter fluid. This leaves me with the assumption that the fuel system is jacked. Another syptom is that the two fuel level indicators blink even with gas in the tank. I assume the problems are somewhat related? I read a few posts and think my next step is to clean the carbs. Can I do this alone? what is involved? Should take them to a shop? Also, would a new tank be required? There is some rust in the tank, and I'm not to happy about that. I hope I've given enough info for some bearing on the problem. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide!
 

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I probably wont be much help but these guys will have plenty to tell you when they wake up. Until then i can only suggest picking up a clymer maintenance book. I have one for my cbr and it has just about all the info you need to do any kind of servicing to your bike. Makes everything seem simple.

<font color=red>Ride Red</font color=red>
 

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clean the carbs and change the fuel filter. In fact, it may run if the fuel filter is clogged with rust and gummy fuel when you change it.....
 

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First thing to do is get rid of all the old gas in the tank and make sure there isn't any rust or water. Then clean the carbs. Not too bad on that model. Its a ZX600C right?? Then dial in the carbs, (fuel scres-carb sync) and you should be in buisness.

 

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If there's rust in the tank then you need to either treat it or get rid of the tank because that rust will clog fuel filter, fuel bowls, pumps (you get the picture)! Take the bike to a good mechanic so he can clean and set the carbs right and check out the fuel delivery on all carbs! That way you can't go wrong! /images/icons/cool.gif

Okay, your time is up. You owe me 50 cents! /images/icons/tongue.gif

 

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<blockquote><font size=1>In reply to:</font><hr>

If there's rust in the tank then you need to either treat it or get rid of the tank because that rust will clog fuel filter, fuel bowls, pumps (you get the picture)!

<hr></blockquote>


By "treat it" he's talking about having the tank creamed, if done right it works well and is allot cheaper than a new tank.

 

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As far as the carbs go, if you're at all apprehensive about
disassembling them, have someone else do them. The rust in the tank is easy to handle, but you'll need a few things first. A rubber expansion plug for the top of the tank, and a way to block off the area where the petcock goes in the bottom of the tank. Once you have that accomplished, go to the nearest pool supply house and get 1 gallon of hydrochloric or muriatic acid. Mix acid with 2 gallons of water & pour into tank & close off with expansion plug. (Do this in a well ventilated area so you don't have to breath the fumes.) Leave tank upright for 6-8 hours, then turn upside down for 6-8 hours. This will dissolve all rust particles. Once tank is rust free, wash it out THOROGHLY with soap & water 2-3 times. Then ,and this is important, pour 3-4 bottles of DRY GAS into the tank & shake well (this step is critical, as the dry gas mixes with the water to make the water evaporate quickly.) dump out the dry gas & let the tank "air out" for a day. It should be clean & rust free afterwards. As a side note, any time a gas tank is stored it should NOT be sealed, as this is sure to cause rust. It should be left open, so moisture can escape. It's also a good idea to pour a 1/2 cup of oil in & work it around so the oil coats all inside surfaces, this will add further rust prevention. Good luck, Private message me if you have any Q's.

<font color=blue>That's not a <font color=red> THREAT, <font color=blue>it's a <font color=red>PROMISE!!/images/icons/mad.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hehe... I can't seem to find a fuel filter on this thing

:-O

I think it may be internal to the tank.. is that possible?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
#1 - everyone, thanks for all the advice

ZX600D not C

Here's where im at..

re: carbs - i opened them up, and a bunch of gas spilled out. I guess it was flooded? Everything inside seemed clean, and i blew through the fuel line and the air came out the jets or needle or whatever its called. The float seemed to work, as i pressed them the air i was blowing was restricted. So, I would say (not that i know what im talking about) that the carbs are in good enough condition to run. I hope that the whole problem was that they were flooded with 3 year old gas, and putting em back on will work.

Re: Gas Tank
I found a used tank for 70 bux, so i bought it. Its got one scratch and no rust. Unfortunately it's either not for my bike, or for the non-california edition. I'm now either going to take your advice on cleaning the original tank (i bought KLEEN) or see if i can do away with the emissions controls fairly simply.

One question that i have, is where the heck is the fuel filter??

Also, there is no valve for fuel on/off/reserve. Its really odd. The fuel line goes straight from the tank to the carbs rail. Is this normal?

Thanks again for all the help!
 

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When you remove the petcock from the bottom of the tank, you'll see a very fine screen cylinder on the inside, that is the filter.

<font color=blue>That's not a <font color=red> THREAT, <font color=blue>it's a <font color=red>PROMISE!!/images/icons/mad.gif
 

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The pilot fuel jets are prolly the source of your prob... They are usually located right next to the main fuel jets, in the bottom of the carb, under(or on top of, depending on how you're holding the carbs) the floats. They will come out of there if you have a small, flat-blade screwdriver - be careful not to scrape the brass as they are usually a little tight from sitting in there over so many heat-cycles. They have a *tiny* opening in them that is easily obstructed with varnish or small particles... when you clean them out, do *not* use anything metal, only a nylon brush (the brass scratches *very* easily).

 
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