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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having trouble bleeding my brakes. There is no fluid in the calipers and pumping the lever isn't doing anything. Does anyone know what I need to do? I don't have one of those fancy vacuum bleeders.
 

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eStarbucks
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tossing a quick idea out: you could get a length of hose that fits over the bleeder and draw the air out yourself. Tip: make sure the hose is clear and you're paying attention.
 

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Try opening the bleeders, filling the reservoir, and just letting gravity fill the calipers. It'll take a little while, but it's not exactly hard work. When fluid starts coming out the bleeders, close them and use the normal (pumping lever) bleeding method.
 

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Leaving your brake fluid exposed for long periods of time is bad. Try to keep your system sealed at all times. Moisture degrades brake fluid. The simple humidity in the air can ruin fluid lifetime and performance.

But the good news. I had crazy problems just like you are explaining with mine as well. Then I found out that the issue was air in the line at the master cylinder. Try this.

Pump up the lever a few times, no matter if it feels like there is pressure building or not at this point. Break the seal at the master cylinder banjo bolt just for a second until you see fluid seeping. Retighten, release the lever. Repeat until you get no air coming out. Switch back and forth between all three bleed points on your system. (right and left caliper and the master cylinder).

Or you could go get a bleeder valve for the master cylinder. This is where I got mine. www.cyclebrakes.com You want the "Double Bleeder".

If you are still having problems, PM me and I will square you away.

PEACE!
 

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Pump bleeding motorcycle brakes are more of a hassle than car brakes. You have to have the cap on and tightly sealed to pump them. If not you wont put any pressure in the lines. And when the cap is on you cant see how much fluid is in the container very well. And its still a 2 man job, 1 to pump, 1 to do the bleeder valve. I would just get a pump. They are cheap.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
keithzx9r said:
I'm having trouble bleeding my brakes. There is no fluid in the calipers and pumping the lever isn't doing anything. Does anyone know what I need to do? I don't have one of those fancy vacuum bleeders.

[/ QUOTE ]


Keith - Yah, filling an totally empty system is a true PITFA.

Go to a Medical Supply store and get yourself a 60 milliliter "Irrigation Syringe". It'll cost you 10 bucks. Stick a piece of 1/4" tubing on the end of it, and shoot your brakes up like a junkie. You'll be able to backfill all the way up From the caliper to the reservoir. If you're good, you may not even need to bleed it much.

Scott :waytogo:
 

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eScreaming Dizbuster
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It's probably air in the master cylinder, but here's how I deal with it. First protect the paint on your bike by placing a towel under the right handlebar.

Then remove the cover. See that little hole in the bottom? That has to be higher than the hose end of the cylinder. Turn the fork and rotate the cylinder on the bar until the hole (or port, as it's technically called) is where it needs to be. Now carefully squeeze the lever. You'll see a stream of tiny bubbles rising from the port. Continue to gently pump the lever until no more bubbles appear.

It may be necessary to remove the master cylinder from the handlebar to get the port in the proper position. Be careful, and fill the reservoir only halfway to prevent spillage. You can bleed the cylinder off the bar like that. The lever doesn't have to be pulled far, just enough to slightly pressurize the cylinder.

Once the master cylinder is bled, you can gravity-bleed like OFG said. When you get a solid stream of fluid from the caliper, gently squeeze the lever while you simultaneously close the bleeder.

The master cylinder doesn't pressurize the reservoir, so there's no need for the cap to be on.
 

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eScreaming Dizbuster
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[ QUOTE ]
flankr7 said:
Ditto. You don't need the cap on. In my ventures with switching out SS lines, I have had to bleed my system about 4 or 5 times. All of them done all by myself.

PEACE!

[/ QUOTE ]

:waytogo:

I just want to add that while bleeding the master cylinder at the banjo bolt like you said works, it's hard to see if you got all the air. Just as an experiment, you may want to try bleeding at the port like I explained. You may be surprised to see a stream of tiny bubbles (cue the Don Ho) rising out of it.

One more thing is that sometimes small bubbles stick to the sides of the hoses and other components. Lightly tap the cylinder and calipers with a screwdriver handle to knock them loose, and flex the hoses by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the help. I got them bled by putting a small tube on the bleeder and sucking. I still have to bleed them a couple of more times but they're working. :808922-fiddy:
 
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If you use the gravity method, make sure you don't get fluid on your tires and paint. It will permanently stain the tires on contact.
 

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eStarbucks
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[ QUOTE ]
flankr7 said:
Ditto. You don't need the cap on. In my ventures with switching out SS lines, I have had to bleed my system about 4 or 5 times. All of them done all by myself.

PEACE!

[/ QUOTE ]

Speedbleeders make bleeding the system a 1 man job... and it's not so bad to do at that point.

They're just a pita to instal (mostly because I hate dealing with brake fluid)
 

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I don't know if I have really long arms or what, but I've never had a problem squeezing the lever with one hand and opening the bleeder with the other. I'm baffled by why people always say it's a two man job. /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif
 

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I'm 6'3" and I can just barely do the front left brake on my bike, and you cant see how much fluid is left in the reservior. I do have a slighty bigger bike it being a 91. Plus it can get messy doing it that way being alone. 1) you dont want to soke your tires in brake fluid, 2) I know that if your pads get fork oil on them it will ruin them, its prolly' the same for brake fluid.
 

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eScreaming Dizbuster
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Don't you put a hose on the end of the bleeder? /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

That's why bleeders have nipples on them, so you can put a hose on them and run the other end into a container.

Onearmedbandit is the only person I can think of who would have trouble doing the job on his own.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
OldFatGuy said:
I don't know if I have really long arms or what, but I've never had a problem squeezing the lever with one hand and opening the bleeder with the other. I'm baffled by why people always say it's a two man job. /wwwthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

Ditto. Never had a probem here either. Although I do have to pull the bars one way or the other to reach everything...
 
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