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Hello All
I have a brand new 600 zzr and I am brakeing it in acording to the instructions
Below 5000 for 500 miles then 6000 for 500 with an oil change in between. I just ride to work the long way you know taking it easy. Why not? Every one tells me to run it hard new or something like " If you dont run it hard new it wont run hard latter" Are they crazy or am I missinformed ? it dose not matter I all ready have 500 miles on it and I love it
 

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On older bikes it was very critical to do the break in correctly because it was all put together by hand. But now manufacturing tolerances are HUGELY tighter, so break in isn't as critical as it used to be, though it does make some difference. Break in is one of those topics where you can ask 20 different people and get 20 different answers, but this is my take on it:

The most important thing is to get a good seal between the rings and cylinder walls, and accomplishing quickly and well that *does* take a little pressure. So there is a little truth to the 'break it in hard/fast' theory. But a bunch of folks use that as an excuse to thrash on the bike from day 1, which I don't agree with either, since bearings and other rotating parts do like a gentler approach...

So for what it's worth, I prefer the "beat on it a little, but don't abuse it" school of thought.

- DO NOT LUG THE MOTOR. This is probably the worst thing you can do.

- Use the manufacturer's RPM recommendations as a guide, but don't worry if you surpass them from time to time.

- Avoid prolonged cruising at constant RPM.

- Do use hard acceleration, but follow that with some easier cruising to allow the oil system to flush materials that may have been loosened through the filter.

- (I'm told that) Backpressure is pretty effective at helping rings to seal. Rolling down a long hill with the throttle off (engine braking) is effective at developing said backpressure.

- Regular dinosaur juice for the first 3~4 oil changes. Synthetics can be too good at their jobs, which delays break in.


My $0.02.

Scott :smile:
 

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I would add that heat cycles are also important. You don't want to do the first 1000 miles, 250 miles at a time. Ride it no more than 100 miles and park it and let it cool completely.

When you ride make sure it gets fully up to temperature and stays there for a while before you park it again. This can be a bit difficult this time of year depending on where you live. Obviously you don't want it to over-heat but make sure it gets warmed up.

The most important thing is that the oil gets hot. The gage on the dash is water (coolant) temp. The oil temp will rise to about the same value, but it takes about twice as long to get there. For example, if after 15 mins of riding the gage is up into the "normal" range, it will take another 15 mins for the oil to get there as well.
 

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Speaking of which, there are a few schools of thought on changing your oil and filter. Some people like to change the oil and filter at the half-way point between new and the first scheduled oil change. The reason being is that the first 500 or so miles, a lot of metal shavings could be floating around.

Oh yeah...don't buy cheap filters. You get what you pay for :smile:
 

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I'm in the same boat...new bike. I'm following the break in procedure mostly, but read the info on this website...

Break-in Secrets

I found it pretty interesting. I'm still going to stick with the 6900 rpm limit for the first 600 miles, but as per the article, you should load rings up with a heavier throttle hand in higher gears to help the rings to seat...
 

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Congratulations on the new bikes everyone.

I'll just keep my old turd limping along with baling wire for another year. :bawling:

If you plan to use synthetic oil there's no reason to not do so immediately. The sooner you can get the benefits the better.

Break-in is more than piston rings. Keep the drive chain lubed and adjusted, and check the coolant level. It can't hurt to check the torque of suspension, brake, and engine mount bolts. Fool around with lever and pedal adjustments to get them where they feel right for you. Keep an eye on tire pressure, and try fine-tuning the suspension adjustments. Check your headlight aim too.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
TravellinJones said:
I'll just keep my old turd limping along with baling wire for another year. :bawling:

[/ QUOTE ]

:808875-bs: :rolling: As I've commented when TJ has posted pics, his CBR is pristine.

But, at least he wasn't lying about the rest of what he said...although with that guy you never can be sure. :wink:
 

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[ QUOTE ]
TravellinJones said:
It's all in the details. I use only the best baling wire. :wink:

[/ QUOTE ]



Duct-taping the bodywork from the INSIDE helps lots, too.

Scott :laugh:
 

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[ QUOTE ]
scotteq said:




- (I'm told that) Backpressure is pretty effective at helping rings to seal. Rolling down a long hill with the throttle off (engine braking) is effective at developing said backpressure.

[/ QUOTE ] Maybe some dyno time with "run-ups" and "full compression" slow down could work here. Just don't heat it up too much (or go crazy with RPM's) [ QUOTE ]


- Regular dinosaur juice for the first 3~4 oil changes. Synthetics can be too good at their jobs, which delays break in.

[/ QUOTE ] More good advice, here.
 
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